Posted by on Nov 18, 2013 in Resources Misc | 0 comments

Safety

ABOUT AUTISM WANDERING / ELOPEMENT

Autism is a diagnosis that represents many symptoms and behavioral tendencies, some of which can lead to serious health and safety risks including death. In 2008, Danish researchers found that the mortality rate among the autism population is twice as high as in the general population. In 2001, a California research team attributed elevated mortality among people with autism in large part to drowning. Drowning, prolonged exposure, and other wandering-related factors remain among the top causes of death within the autism population. In a 2007 online poll through the National Autism Association, 92% of parents reported that their children with autism have a tendency to wander. In 2011, preliminary data from a Interactive Autism Network study found that almost half of all children wander.

DEFINITIONS

WANDERING: Wandering means to move about from place to place with or without a fixed plan.

ELOPEMENT: The act of running away, wandering away, walking away, escaping, or otherwise leaving a safe setting unsupervised or unnoticed.

ABOUT AUTISM WANDERING / ELOPEMENT

GOAL-DIRECTED WANDERING: Wandering with the purpose of getting to something (water, train tracks, park, an item or place of obsession, etc.), or getting away from something (noise, bright colors, clutter, commotion, etc.).
NON GOAL-DIRECTED WANDERING: Wandering with seemingly no purpose; random and aimless movement from one place to another.
WANDERING – OTHER: Any other type of wandering – nighttime wandering, or wandering due to disorientation or confusion.
BOLTING / FLEEING: The act of suddenly running or bolting, usually to quickly get away from something, or in negative reaction to an event, anxiety, excitement or stress

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NEW MEDICAL DIAGNOSIS CODEA new medical diagnosis code has been approved by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). When implemented in October 2011, the code will be listed as V40.31 – Wandering in Diseases Classified Elsewhere.
Caregivers of those at risk of wandering should discuss this diagnosis code with their physician. Official diagnosis may assist with insurance coverage for safety equipment and strengthen requests for implementation of safety-related strategies and accommodations in a student’s IEP.

Source National Autism Association

 

 

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New Caregivers Guide

New Firstresponders Guide

 

 

 

 

:: LEARN MORE AT OUR SISTER SITE,
AWAARE
:: JOIN ‘WANDERING PREVENTION’ ON FACEBOOK
:: DOWNLOAD FIRST–RESPONDER FORM
:: DOWNLOAD EMERGENCY WANDERING PLAN
:: SEE WANDERING FAQs
:: SEE WANDERING RESOURCES
:: WHITE PAPER ON LETHAL OUTCOMES
IN ASD
:: DOWNLOAD WANDERING BROCHURE

BECOME AWAARE


With little public understanding about autism-related wandering, coupled with a lack of resources to combat occurrences, drowning deaths associated with autism elopement remain a leading cause of fatalities among children and adults on the autism spectrum. Although no formal data exists about the number of wandering incidents per year, cases are becoming increasingly common and awareness alone can play a major role in reducing occurrences. To learn more, click here.

RESEARCH


Autism is a diagnosis that represents many symptoms, some of which can lead to serious health and safety risks, including death. In 2008, Danish researchers found that the mortality rate among the autism population is twice as high as the general population. In 2001, a California research team attributed elevated death rates in large part to drowning. Drowning, prolonged exposure, and other wandering-related factors remain among the top causes of death within the autism population. Currently, no estimates exist and no formal methods are in place to track how many children and adults wander per year, but in a 2007 online poll through the National Autism Association, 92% of parents reported that their child/ren with autism have a tendency to wander.

DOWNLOAD & SHARE


It’s important to familiarize yourself with the dangers of wandering, as well as share the information with friends, family and members of the community. Prevention materials, including this general brochure, can be printed and sent electronically to anyone who may need the information. Other sections of this site, such as FAQ’s, covers many aspects of prevention, response and resources. Anyone with a child or adult with autism should complete a first-responder alert form and consider a Family Wandering Emergency Plan (FWEP). For those that have a child in a school or daycare setting, a sample IEP letter has been created to help ensure your child’s safety outside of the home. To reach others who may not be aware of wandering prevention initiatives, share this onFacebookand other sites, or simply email the information to friends. Outreach is a critical component in spreading the word about autism-related wandering.


WHAT TO DO IF SOMEONE WANDERS


QUICK LINKS

 


:: FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
:: HELPFUL MATERIALS
:: TRACKING TECHNOLOGY
:: WHERE TO FIND SWIMMING LESSONS
:: PARENT STORIES
:: FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICIALS
:: FOR PHYSICIANS AND THERAPISTS
:: FOR SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS

Websites for saftey items
 http://www.mypreciouskid.com/child-autism-safety.html
 http://www.lucasworks.org/autism-safety.html
 http://www.warnonline.org/english/autism.htm 
http://autism.about.com/b/2009/06/14/autism-safety-share-your-tips.htm 
http://www.autismteachingtools.com/page/bbbbfg/bbbbxv
 http://www.ehow.com/list_6602812_fire-safety-activities-children-autism.html

  

 

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